Tuesday, March 4, 2008

Texas, Ohio, Rhode Island and Vermont

Ellie has been agonizing a bit over today's primaries. I myself have been more philosophical. I like to think that it's still possible to trust the process. The worst possible outcome, of course, is not the loss or win for either Clinton or Obama, but the protraction of the bitter divide in the Democratic party. McCain is enjoying a significant period as Republican front runner, consolidating the support of his party into a more formidable force than I would have imagined a couple of months ago. If the Democrats continue to leave this field open to him while they squabble, it will not bode well for the coming months and the November election. And I can frankly imagine no bleaker scenario for the country and the world than another "conservative" American administration.

I put that word in quotation marks because I do not believe that what is currently marketed under that label is true conservatism. The excesses of the Bush years--pre-emptive war, nation-building, outrageous budgetary irresponsibility, and the apparently total absence of accountability--these are not, surely, conservative values. McCain offers nothing other than a perpetuation of the Bush policies that have brought us where we are today.

So it's not the political fate of Clinton or Obama that's at stake, it's the viability of the Democratic party as contenders for both the presidency and working majorities in both houses of Congress. I understand Ellie's butterflies. On the other hand, I believe that we will get what, as a nation, we ask for and deserve. THAT'S the (potentially) depressing part of this. Let's wait and see...

6 comments:

robin andrea said...

I've read various opinions about possible outcomes if Clinton wins Ohio, but not Texas; wins both but not by a large enough margin to substantially increase her delegate count; loses both but chooses to forge on. I'm waiting to see how it all turns out today, but I don't feel particularly nervous about it. I'll start to get queasy if Hillary loses, but chooses to stay in the race. Then, the Democrats will be doing the Republican's job for them by continuing to smash each other for another month or so.

Jay Andrew Allen said...

I've found myself lately way too emotionally wrapped up in the outcome of today. The past few days I've compensated by cutting many political sites out of my news feeds (how much up-to-the-second polling information do I really "need"??), and reconciling myself to any potential outcome.

I do wants the Dems to triumph in November. And I want Obama to be our candidate. But I keep telling myself that, no matter what happens on March 4th, I have to live in the reality of March 5th - and beyond. There will still be an environment to save, a food system to revamp, and a war to end no matter what happens in March or November. I'll still have a responsibility to the world to fight for change no matter what state I find the world in tomorrow.

That realization has helped a lot. It's made me more focused on the issues as opposed to the candidates - who are, after all, just people. I can't say I'm totally detached from today's results, but I'm much less obsessive than I was just a week ago.

PeterAtLarge said...

Robin--yes, I too have read many different possible outcomes, and the bottom line is, no one knows! Yet! A nail-biter... Let's just hope it's not Democratic suicide again. And JAJ, thanks for the useful piece of wisdom. A good way to get perspective on all this.

Sometimes Saintly Nick said...

Excellent post, Peter. I agree 100%.

Cardozo said...

Jay, I've been obsessing too, and I think Peter's reminder - that will ultimately "get what we ask for" - is apt.

Obama has shown the charisma and stamina to get his message across. If the majority of delegates get pledged to his opponent, it just means we have more work to do.

khengsiong said...

Latest update:
Hillary wins Texas, Ohio and Rhode Island, so the battle goes on.

Man, I have had enough of election news...