Monday, April 30, 2007


One Day Blog Silence

3 comments:

carly said...

P: as this is comment and not a blog, I picked this gem up on the livejournal site, Buddhists. Do visit the beautiful site of it's contributor, iamkatia, a gorgeous Buddhist thinking gal. http://iamkatia.livejournal.com/ who entered:

I love this paragraph by

Dilgo Kyhentse, Rinpoche
excerpt from 'Pith Instructions on the Great Perfection'.

The everyday practice is simply to develop a complete acceptance and openness to all situations and emotions, and to all people, experiencing everything totally without mental reservations and blockages, so that one never withdraws or centralizes into oneself.This produces a tremendous energy which usually is locked up in the process of mental evasion and a general running away from life experiences. Clarity of awareness may, in its initial stages, be unpleasant or fear-inspiring; if so, then one should open oneself completely to the pain or the fear and welcome it. In this way the barriers created by one's own habitual emotional reactions and prejudices are broken down.

yes.

carly said...

My friend, Peter Clothier, who writes The Buddha Diaries, at http://thebuddhadiaries.blogspot.com/, was wondering if Buddhism and Taoism are like yin and yang. I set me to think:

I don't think the light-giving ideas, Buddhism and Taoism can interact as yin and yang, anymore than evil philosophies. They are merely descriptions of the forces at work, distinctions to be made about how the potential energies operate in the Taoist symbol, Taijitu. The dark side of the Taijitu is the empty, degenerate, destructive, or evil potential of all things, the light side, the full, creative, mild.
But more than that the, philosophical systems are not something subject to the laws of fullness and emptiness, because they are not things. A man may change into his opposite, but I don't think ideas can change into their opposite in and of themselves. Ideas play some part in the cause of shift of equilibrium, but don't enter in to it, I am supposing, like a catalyst in a new formation of elements. That seems to be it, in man's world they are catalysts, like the wind which moves the seed from the branch to the soil or the water which wears on a sharp rock until it is smooth and round.

Since we are the only things in the universe which twist and distort ideas to our ends, we are the vessels of potential not the ideas themselves. Man's world is not harmonious because he has not sorted and placed ideas, much less things, according to nature's law. But the blame cannot be in the ideas. It is in man's misuse of describing, using, and placing them.

carly said...

My friend, Peter Clothier, who writes The Buddha Diaries, at http://thebuddhadiaries.blogspot.com/, was wondering if Buddhism and Taoism are like yin and yang. I set me to think:

I don't think the light-giving ideas, Buddhism and Taoism can interact as yin and yang, anymore than evil philosophies. They are merely descriptions of the forces at work, distinctions to be made about how the potential energies operate in the Taoist symbol, Taijitu. The dark side of the Taijitu is the empty, degenerate, destructive, or evil potential of all things, the light side, the full, creative, mild.
But more than that the, philosophical systems are not something subject to the laws of fullness and emptiness, because they are not things. A man may change into his opposite, but I don't think ideas can change into their opposite in and of themselves. Ideas play some part in the cause of shift of equilibrium, but don't enter in to it, I am supposing, like a catalyst in a new formation of elements. That seems to be it, in man's world they are catalysts, like the wind which moves the seed from the branch to the soil or the water which wears on a sharp rock until it is smooth and round.

Since we are the only things in the universe which twist and distort ideas to our ends, we are the vessels of potential not the ideas themselves. Man's world is not harmonious because he has not sorted and placed ideas, much less things, according to nature's law. But the blame cannot be in the ideas. It is in man's misuse of describing, using, and placing them.